• The “EASA” and “non-EASA” classifications

    Aircraft are divided into two areas for licensing and airworthiness purposes:

    • EASA aircraft; and
    • non-EASA aircraft

    Non-EASA aircraft are also known as ‘Annex II’ aircraft, as they are listed in Annex II to the Basic Regulation, the European legislation which is the source of requirements for pilot licences.

    This classification applies to types of aircraft, not individual aircraft. For example, the Cessna 172N type of aircraft is classed as an EASA aircraft, so any particular Cessna 172N is an EASA aircraft.

    Meanwhile, the De Havilland Chipmunk T10 is classed as a non-EASA aircraft, so any particular De Havilland Chipmunk T10 is a non-EASA aircraft.

    EASA aircraft fall under the regulations of the European Aviation Safety Agency (EASA), while non-EASA aircraft are regulated by national aviation authorities. The CAA is the national aviation authority in the UK.

    Many more aircraft are classified as EASA than non-EASA. We maintain a list of non-EASA aircraft for ease of reference.

    Reasons for classification

    The classification is based on various technical aspects of the aircraft type in question, such as its complexity and the age of its design. It is not based on where an aircraft was manufactured or is registered.

    Many aircraft in Europe are classed as EASA aircraft wherever they have been manufactured or are registered. This includes many of the types commonly found at flying schools – like the Cessna range, the Piper PA-28s and PA-38s, Cirrus etc.

    A detailed and comprehensive list of aircraft types classed as EASA aircraft is available on the EASA website. View the list on the EASA website.

    Alternatively, you can look up a particular aircraft on our registration database, G-INFO.

    EASA and non-EASA licences

    In the UK, if you hold an EASA licence you will be able to fly:

    • EASA aircraft and
    • UK-registered non-EASA aircraft

    as long as the aircraft type is covered by the ratings included in your licence. More information about ratings.

    If you hold a UK national licence, you will be able to fly UK-registered non-EASA aircraft, as long as the aircraft type is covered by the ratings included in your licence. A UK national licence will not permit you to fly EASA aircraft.

    I hold a UK national licence... I hold an EASA licence...
    ...can I fly EASA aircraft? No, you will need an EASA licence instead. Yes, as long as you hold the appropriate rating on your licence
    ...can I fly non-EASA aircraft? Yes, as long as you hold the appropriate rating on your licence and the aircraft is registered in the UK Yes, as long as you hold the appropriate rating on your licence and the aircraft is registered in the UK

    For example: The Cessna 172 is an EASA aircraft. The Tiger Moth is a non-EASA aircraft. Both are single engine piston aircraft. So if you hold an EASA licence such as the PPL(A) or LAPL(A) that allows you to fly with a single-engine piston rating, then you can fly both the Cessna 172 (EASA) and the Tiger Moth (non-EASA). However, if you hold a non-EASA national licence, such as the UK NPPL(SSEA), then you can only fly the Tiger Moth.

    However, in order to fly certain non-EASA aircraft you will need specific UK national type ratings, which can only be issued onto a UK national licence and not onto an EASA licence.