• The G-INFO database has an estimate of the minimum insurance requirements, in SDR's and Pounds Sterling, based on the maximum take-off weight of the aircraft and the maximum number of passengers carried. You may advise the CAA of a lower maximum number of passengers carried and this lower figure will be used as the basis for estimate.

    SDR means “Special Drawing Right” as defined by the International Monetary Fund. The full description of the SDR can be found at the IMF website. Briefly, the SDR serves as the unit of account of the IMF and some other international organizations. Its value is based on a basket of key international currencies. The SDR is already in use in international regulations covering mandatory aircraft insurance for public transport aircraft.

    To view the current conversion rates from SDR's to other currencies and vice versa see the IMF website SDR conversion rates.

    The G-INFO UK Register website contains an estimate of the minimum insurance requirements for individual aircraft in Pounds Sterling.

    The G-INFO database has an estimate of the minimum insurance requirements, in SDR's and GBP for all currently registered aircraft. This is based on the recent exchange rate, the maximum take-off weight of the aircraft and the maximum or declared number of passengers carried.

    The CAA will normally consider evidence of insurance, and therefore compliance with the Regulation, on the basis of the exchange rate between Sterling and the SDR in place at the inception of the policy. However, owners and operators need to be aware that it is their responsibility to ensure that adequate cover exists for each and every flight. If owners or operators have concerns over their level of cover they should contact their broker for advice.

    No. However, if evidence of insurance is supplied as part of the registration process, or in response to a request for evidence, the Aircraft Registration Section will confirm in writing that the aircraft met the requirements of the legislation on the day that the details were verified. See also 'how do I demonstrate compliance?' below.

    The G-INFO website gives details of those aircraft that have had their insurance details verified.

    No, but it must be insured to the minimum levels before any flight is undertaken. Additionally, if you are applying to register an aircraft that is not currently flying, such as a new homebuilt, you must give a declaration that the aircraft will not fly until you have first supplied evidence of valid insurance to the Aircraft Registration Section. This declaration can be made on the CA1 registration application form.

    No, The EC regulation makes reference to minimum levels of cover per passenger rather than per seat. Therefore, if a registered owner is only ever going to carry a maximum of "X" amount of passengers and the aircraft is insured accordingly, then this lower passenger number will be used to determine the minimum levels of cover required rather than the number of seats actually fitted on the aircraft. There is no requirement to physically remove seats.

    No, it is only mandatory to provide insurance information to the CAA when requested to do so by the CAA, if your aircraft is going through a change of registered ownership or if your aircraft is joining the Register. Should you wish to advise the CAA anyway, you can do so by contacting the Aircraft Registration Section in writing or by email.

    Unless we have been advised otherwise, the figure that appears on the estimate and the one that is used in the calculation to determine the minimum insurance requirements is the design maximum for the aircraft type. If you wish to notify us of the declared maximum number of passengers that the aircraft is going to carry please contact the Aircraft Registration section in writing or by email. Please note that it is not mandatory to advise the CAA of the lower declared maximum number of passengers carried unless requested to do so by the CAA, if your aircraft is going through a change of registered ownership or if your aircraft is joining the Register.

    Additionally, the design maximum number of passengers for hot air balloons is based on a calculation using the notional per person weight of 96kg as the type certificates for hot air balloons do not specify an exact maximum number of passengers. As such, the calculation may over or underestimate the actual maximum number of passengers carried in some circumstances.

    A passenger is defined in the regulation as follows. 'Passenger' means any person who is on a flight with the consent of the air carrier or the aircraft operator, excluding on-duty members of both the flight crew and the cabin crew.

    Anyone on board an aircraft must either be a member of the crew or a passenger. Article 26(1) of the Air Navigation Order 2005 provides that in order to be a member of the flight crew a person must hold an appropriate licence. There are however certain exceptions to this, for example, at article 26(2)(c) which allows someone without a licence to act as a member of the flight crew where they are obtaining instruction in flying from a flying instructor on board the aircraft (i.e. the typical dual instruction flight). Therefore, if the person under instruction either has an appropriate licence or comes under one of the exceptions in Article 26 they are considered to be a crew member, if not they are considered to be a passenger.

    Yes. As a result of the consultation the lower limit of 100,000 SDR's per passenger applies to aircraft under 2700 kg engaged in non-commercial operations.

    Yes, providing it exceeds the combined minimum requirements for each element of the third party, passenger, and baggage liability.

    With the exception of aircraft, including gliders, with a MTOM<500kg used solely for a non-commercial purpose or local instruction which does not entail crossing international borders, War Risk insurance is required for all aircraft and is set at the same levels as those set for Third Party insurance. This should be clearly identifiable on the insurance certificate including the amount of cover. For an estimate of the minimum levels of cover required for an individual aircraft see the G-INFO database.

    Certain classes of aircraft are completely excluded from the regulation such as model aircraft and hang gliders; see Article 2 of the EC Regulation for details. However, aircraft with a maximum take-off mass of less than 500kg, which are not used for commercial purposes or are used for local flight instruction which does not entail the crossing of international borders, are only excluded from the regulation in respect of the insurance obligations relating to war risk and terrorism. This means that aircraft in this category do need to have minimum levels of cover in respect of third party and passenger liability.

    To check the minimum requirements for an individual aircraft please see the estimate on the G-INFO site.

    Yes. The Regulation applies to all aircraft (subject to certain exclusions, such as state aircraft) flying into the UK as well as the rest of the European Economic Area.

    A state aircraft is defined in the Chicago Convention 1944 as an aircraft used in military, customs and police services.

    The CAA will be carrying out spot checks on aircraft. To demonstrate compliance a copy of the valid certificate of insurance should be sufficient. It is recommended that evidence be carried on board the aircraft in order to present to an inspector if required.

    Insurance documentation will be routinely checked each time an aircraft is registered, either at the time of first entry on the UK Register or when there is a change of registered ownership. Additionally, a number of aircraft owners will be requested to produce evidence of insurance on a “rolling audit” basis. Note, however, that it is for the operator of an aircraft to ensure compliance with the Regulation at all times. To knowingly operate without sufficient cover is an offence under the Civil Aviation (insurance) Regulations 2005 - Statutory Instrument No 1089 2005.

    For the purposes of monitoring compliance with the regulation, for aircraft that are not operated by an Operating Licence Holder, the CAA's aim is to verify insurance at least every three to four years.

    The CAA will normally consider evidence of insurance, and therefore compliance with the Regulation, on the basis of the exchange rate between Sterling and the SDR in place at the inception of the policy. However, owners and operators need to be aware that it is their responsibility to ensure that adequate cover exists for each and every flight. If owners or operators have concerns over their level of cover they should contact their broker for advice.

    If you wish to supply evidence of insurance directly to the CAA ahead of any request to do so please either fax, post or email a copy of your certificate of insurance to the Aircraft Registration section.

    Aviation insurance in the UK is a niche market and there are not the economies of scale that are present in the motor vehicle insurance market to justify the cost of setting up a similar integrated database. In 2010 there were approximately 32,000,000 motor vehicles registered in the UK as against approximately 20,000 aircraft.

    However, the CAA is in discussion with brokers with a view to obtaining data directly from them, but at present some brokers are not in a position to supply policy data in a standardised format, either for technical or administrative reasons, to the CAA.

    This will depend on whether you are the holder of an Air Transport or Operating Licence. Operators of such aircraft are required to demonstrate compliance at all times under the terms of that Licence - For further information see Airline Licensing.

    Otherwise -insurance documentation will be routinely checked each time an aircraft is registered, either at the time of first entry on the UK Register or when there is a change of registered ownership. Additionally, a number of aircraft owners will be requested to produce evidence of insurance on a “rolling audit” basis and also through physical inspections at airfields. Note however it is for the operator of an aircraft to ensure compliance with the Regulation at all times. To knowingly operate without sufficient cover is an offence under the Civil Aviation (insurance) Regulations 2005 - Statutory Instrument No 1089 2005.

    The CAA will normally consider evidence of insurance, and therefore compliance with the Regulation, on the basis of the exchange rate between Sterling and the SDR in place at the inception of the policy. However, owners and operators need to be aware that it is their responsibility to ensure that adequate cover exists for each and every flight. If owners or operators have concerns over their level of cover they should contact their broker for advice.

    If you wish to supply evidence of insurance directly to the CAA ahead of any request to do so please either fax, post or email a copy of your certificate of insurance to the Aircraft Registration section.

    For the purposes of monitoring compliance with the regulation, for aircraft that are not operated by an Operating Licence Holder, the CAA's aim is to verify insurance at least every three to four years.

    If an aircraft is not flying there is no requirement to have minimum levels of passenger or third party insurance. If a registered has been requested to produce evidence of insurance whilst the aircraft is not flying or no third party or passenger insurance is in place they can make a "no flight" declaration instead.

    This declaration states that the registered owner will not permit that aircraft to be flown aircraft unless they have first provided the CAA with a certificate of insurance or other evidence of insurance.

    No, you do not need to wait for confirmation to be received before the next flight is undertaken; it is the provision of evidence that is the key requirement of this part of the Regulation.

    However, the CAA will confirm receipt of the insurance and verify that it meets the requirements of the legislation. This will be done either by email or by letter in accordance with our service standards.

    It is the aircraft operator's responsibility. The regulation defines aircraft operator as follows:

    'aircraft operator' means the person or entity, not being an air carrier, who has continual effective disposal of the use or operation of the aircraft; the natural or legal person in whose name the aircraft is registered shall be presumed to be the operator, unless that person can prove that another person is the operator;

    Not necessarily.

    The regulation requires that insurance cover, in compliance with the regulations, exists for each and every flight. As long as the cover is sufficient in all respects for the flight being undertaken the registered owner does not have to be the insured party. However, the insurance broker should be aware of the reasons why the insured party is not the owner of the aircraft as they may consider this a “material fact”.

    The MTOM is a parameter that is part of the Type Design Standard of an aircraft. A change to the MTOM is a design change (modification) and must be approved by the relevant regulatory authority through the auspices of the aircraft manufacturer, or another suitably approved design organisation. Such a modification could be generic to a type, or aircraft specific. The embodiment of an approved modification is the only means of permanently changing the declared MTOM for an aircraft.

    Operators who embody modifications which reduce the maximum declared take off mass must advise the CAA Applications and Certifications Department to ensure that the aircraft register database includes the correct data. We will also need to know the provenance of the relevant modification's approval.

    The definition of “commercial operation” in the Insurance Regulations is “commercial operation means an operation for remuneration and/or hire.” This definition is not limited to commercial air transport but would include other forms of commercial operation.

    No. Providing details have already been supplied to the Airline Licensing Section in accordance with their existing requirements there is no additional requirement to supply evidence to the Aircraft Registration Section.

    For further information see Airline Licensing.