• General

    All pilot licences require a medical certificate or declaration of some description. While it is fine to have a trial flight and some initial lessons, you should avoid committing to a full training programme before checking that you meet the relevant medical requirements and undertaking a medical assessment if one is required.

    Depending on the type of flying you wish to do and your general medical fitness, there are different options available for the type of aircraft that you may wish to fly.

    Learning to Fly

    If you are at the start of your journey to gain a UK flight crew licence, at present you have a number of options in terms of the licence you will be training for; more information can be found here.

    For the NPPL and UK PPL, not including UK Part-FCL licences like the LAPL or PPL, you can make a Pilot Medical Declaration (PMD), (see the full details about the PMD below) and commence flight training and make application for the issue of a UK NPPL or PPL(Balloon or Gyroplane) only. There are limitations to operating with the PMD, they are also detailed below. 

    For UK Part-FCL licences, you will need to hold either a valid Class 1, 2 or LAPL medical certificate depending on which licence you will be applying for. 

    What can I fly and where?

    A UK Part-FCL PPL with a valid UK Part-Med Class 2 Medical Certificate would allow you to fly a UK (G) registered aircraft, for example common general aviation (GA) types such as, Grob 109 TMG, Cessna 152, Piper PA28 or Guimbal Cabri G2 helicopter.

    A UK PPL issued in accordance with the Air Navigation Order (ANO) with a valid UK Part-Med Class 2 Medical Certificate would allow you to fly a UK (G) registered non-Part 21 aircraft, for example microlights, homebuilt, ex-military or aircraft that have moved to a Permit to Fly.

    It would also allow you to fly these aircraft, from the UK to other countries and within the airspace of other countries, subject to any limitations on the Permit to Fly (if applicable).

    A UK Part-FCL SPL and BPL with a valid UK Part-Med Class 2 Medical Certificate would also allow you to fly sailplanes and balloons, within the airspace of other countries (subject to any specific requirements in that country).

    UK Part-Med Classes 1 or 2 Medical Certificates

    If you are undergoing training for UK Part-FCL PPL, CPL or MPL prior to your first solo flight you are required to hold an appropriate Medical Certificate. It is therefore, a good idea to obtain the necessary Medical Certificate for the licence you intended to hold or aspire to hold before you spend lots of money on your flight training.

    Your chosen training organisation may also require you to hold a Medical Certificate before you start flight training.

    For a UK Part-FCL PPL, the minimum is a UK Part-Med Class 2 Medical Certificate can be obtained following a medical assessment conducted an AeroMedical Examiner (AME).

    For a UK Part-FCL CPL or MPL, the minimum is a UK Part-Med Class 1 Medical Certificate can be obtained following a medical assessment conducted an AeroMedical Examiner (AME).

    Medical Certificates can be issued with some limitations or restrictions where applicants do not meet the minimum standards these can be explained in more detail by the AME.

           • Information about applying for a UK Part-Med Class 1 and 2 Medical Certificates can be found on our apply for a medical certificate page. It is issued by an AME. Find one near you using our  Search for an AME service.

    UK Part-Med LAPL Medical Certificates

    If you are undergoing training for UK Part-FCL LAPL prior to your first solo flight you are required to hold an appropriate Medical Certificate. It is therefore, a good idea to obtain the necessary Medical Certificate for the licence you intended to hold or aspire to hold before you spend lots of money on your flight training.
    Your chosen training organisation may also require you to hold a Medical Certificate before you start flight training.
    For a UK Part-FCL LAPL, the minimum is a UK Part-Med LAPL Medical Certificate can be obtained following a medical assessment conducted either by your GP or an AME.
    For a UK Part-SFCL SPL and UK Part-BFCL BPL the minimum is a UK Part-Med LAPL Medical Certificate can be obtained following a medical assessment conducted either by your GP or an AME.
    A UK Part-FCL LAPL, SPL and BPL with valid UK Part-Med LAPL Medical Certificate would allow you to fly a UK (G) registered aircraft, for example Grob 103 sailplane, Grob 109 TMG or Cameron Balloons.

    Self-declaring your medical fitness using the Pilot Medical Declaration  

    Once you have a licence, if you only want to fly UK (G) registered aircraft in UK airspace you can use the online Pilot Medical Declaration (PMD).

    A medical declaration is an affirmation of your medical ‘fitness to fly’ and may be used to exercise the privileges of a qualifying pilot’s licence with certain conditions and limitations.

    Pilots must not make a pilot medical declaration if they do not reasonably believe that they meet the medical requirements for a Group 1 (Car) Licence issued by the Driver and Vehicle Licensing Agency and in addition, comply with the following requirements.

    To only fly aircraft no greater than 2000 kg MTOM
    You may fly an aircraft no greater than 2000kg MTOM provided you are not taking medication for any psychiatric illness. If you are taking medication for a psychiatric illness you must consult an AME and apply for a LAPL (or higher) medical certificate, or

    To fly any aircraft no greater than 5700kg MTOM
    You may fly an aircraft no greater than 5700kg MTOM provided you do not suffer from any physical or mental condition or illness, or any history of such a condition or illness that might impair the safe operation of normal flight controls or render you unfit at any time to perform any function for which the licence is granted. As a minimum, such conditions include:

       a) any alcohol or drug abuse, addiction or misuse,

       b)    any neurological condition requiring medication,

       c)    any functional disability likely to impair safe operation of normal flight controls,

       d)    any recent surgery or new medical treatment,

       e)    any collapse, fainting (syncope), seizure or loss of consciousness,

       f)     any history of (a) to (e); or

       g)    other medical conditions specified by the CAA:

                          I.        Being prescribed medication for any psychiatric illness,

                        II.        Bipolar disorder, schizophrenia or other psychotic illness, or a diagnosis of personality disorder,

                       III.        Dementia or cognitive impairment,

                       IV.        Being prescribed medication or treatment for angina or heart failure,

                        V.        Cardiac surgical procedures including coronary angioplasty or stenting and cardiac device implantation,

                       VI.        Insulin treatment for diabetes,

                     VII.        Chronic lung disease with shortness of breath on exertion.

    If any of the above are present or you are unsure about the applicability of a condition, treatment or medication, you must consult with an AME to discuss if these conditions, treatments or medications would prevent you making a medical declaration.

    The AME may consult with the CAA Medical Department on such issues and depending on the outcome of such discussion this may require you to apply for a LAPL or Class 2 medical certificate (as appropriate to the privileges that you are seeking to exercise) if you wish to continue to fly.

    Pilots holding the following licences can make a medical declaration with the following operational limitations

    Licences issued in accordance with the Air Navigation Order (2016):

    • NPPL (NPPL) to fly UK (G) registered non-Part 21 aircraft.
    • UK PPL to fly UK (G) registered non-Part 21 aircraft, and
    • UK CPL Balloons that is restricted to commercial operation and the privileges of a UK PPL (Balloons and Airships).

    Valid for flying with the following operational conditions:

    1.   With not more than three passengers on board

    2.    In an aircraft with a Maximum Take-Off Mass (MTOM) of 5700kg or less, for which the licence holder has a valid class, type or group rating

    3.    In Visual Meteorological Conditions (VMC) or, in the case of PPL(A), when exercising the privileges of an Instrument Meteorological Conditions (IMC) Rating.

    4.    The privileges of a full Instrument Rating (IR) are not applicable.

    5.    By day or night when exercising the privileges of a Night Rating, provided that colour safety has previously been checked by an AME.

    6.    PMDs are not valid outside of UK airspace, as it is not an internationally recognised medical standard, unless permission has been granted by the State of the airspace you are flying in.

    Licences issued in accordance with the retained UK Part-FCL as amended by Aviation Safety (EU Exit) Amendment (SI 2021/10):

    • UK Part-FCL PPL to fly UK (G) registered Part 21 and non-Part 21 aircraft.
    • UK Part-FCL LAPL to fly UK (G) registered Part 21 and non-Part 21 aircraft.

      Valid for flying with the following operational conditions:

    1. Holders of a UK Part-FCL PPL or LAPL licence can only make a pilot medical declaration to the at or less than 2000kg MTOM criteria as they are limited to the privileges of the LAPL.
    2. The privileges of the UK Part-FCL LAPL are as follows:

             a)    Stated in FCL.105.A(a), act as Pilot-In-Command (‘PIC’) on single-engine piston aeroplanes-land or Touring Motor Gliders (‘TMG’) with a maximum certified take-off mass of 2,000 kg or less, carrying a maximum of 3 passengers, such that there are never more than 4 persons on board the aircraft.

            b)    UK Part-FCL LAPL(H) and PPL(H) holders must only exercise the privileges stated in UK Part-FCL.105.H on a single-engine piston helicopter, that is to act as PIC on single-engine piston helicopters with a maximum certified take-off mass of 2,000 kg or less, carrying a maximum of 3 passengers, such that there are never more than 4 persons on board.

    3.  LAPL (A) and LAPL (H) holders need to have met the appropriate recency requirements and PPL (A) and (H) holders must hold a valid class or type rating.

    4. In Visual Meteorological Conditions (VMC) only.

    5. The privileges of an Instrument Rating (Restricted) (IR(R) and Instrument Rating (IR) are not applicable.

    6. By day or night when exercising the privileges of a Night Rating, provided that colour safety has previously been checked by an AME.

    7. PMDs are not valid outside of UK airspace, as it is not an internationally recognised medical standard, unless permission has been granted by the State of the airspace you are flying in.

    Licences issued in accordance with the retained UK Part-BFCL and UK Part-SFCL as amended by Aviation Safety (EU Exit) Amendment (SI 2021/10): 

    • UK Part-SFCL SPL to fly UK (G) registered Part 21 and non-Part 21 aircraft.
    • UK Part-BFCL BPL to fly UK (G) registered Part 21 and non-Part 21 aircraft.

      Valid for flying with the following operational conditions.

    1. In an aircraft with a Maximum Take-Off Mass (MTOM) of 5700kg or less, for which the licence holder has the appropriate privileges or valid class or group rating.
    2. In Visual Meteorological Conditions (VMC) unless in the case of the SPL, if the pilot holds Sailplane Cloud Flying privileges.
    3. By day or night when exercising the privileges of a Night Rating, provided that colour safety has previously been checked by an AME.
    4. In the case of the BPL:
      • A pilot can conduct commercial passenger ballooning while having made a pilot medical declaration, except where more than 4 persons are on board the aircraft, in which case the pilot shall hold at least a valid class 2 medical certificate.
      • A pilot can conduct commercial operations other than commercial passenger ballooning while having made a pilot medical declaration, except where there are more than 4 persons on board the aircraft, in which case the pilot shall hold at least a valid class 2 medical certificate.

    5. PMDs are not valid outside of UK airspace, as it is not an internationally recognised medical standard, unless permission has been granted by the State of the airspace you are flying in.

    Decrease in medical fitness

    The essential requirement of pilot medical fitness remains.  Licence holders are reminded of their responsibility not to fly in the event of a decrease in their fitness with respect to an illness, medical condition, medical surgery or treatment that may affect the safe operation of an aircraft. Consultation with a medical practitioner and/or AME may be needed to advise the pilot as to whether the fitness conditions of the PMD are met.

    Isle of Man Civil Aviation Administration

    The Isle of Man Civil Aviation Administration has No Operational Objection to flights of UK registered aircraft being conducted to, from and within the Isle of Man1 by holders of UK issued flight crew and pilot licences and who have made UK CAA Pilot Medical Declarations, subject to such flights being conducted in accordance with the privileges and any other conditions imposed by the UK CAA. 

    Completing the Pilot Medical Declaration

    The Pilot Medical Declaration is a free service available via the CAA Customer Portal, it is now no longer possible to use an Avoka form for medical self-declaration.  The Pilot Medical Declaration is available here.

    Unfortunately, applications by post or e-mail cannot be accepted.

    Pilots who make a medical declaration using the portal will not receive an acknowledgement email or confirmation of acceptance of the declaration in any form.

    Pilots can log into the portal to check the details of the medical declaration they have made, in addition there is the function to print the declaration if the pilot wishes to hold a paper copy of the declaration made.

    Declaration validity

    After initially making the declaration it is valid (unless it is withdrawn for one of the reasons listed above) until the age of 70. After the age of 70, a new declaration must be submitted every three years.

    Your licence is invalid without a current medical certificate or having made a medical declaration. It is your responsibility to renew the declaration if it has expired.

    If you have reason to believe you no longer meet the DVLA Group 1 ODL standard, or suffer from any of the specified medical conditions, you must not flyand must withdraw the declaration by ticking the appropriate box and re-submitting the form.  

    You must consult with your own doctors and/or an AME to discuss if these conditions, treatments or medications would prevent you making a medical declaration.

    For minor and self-limiting conditions (for example, colds, day-case procedures, minor musculoskeletal injuries etc) withdrawal of your declaration is not required. You should, however, not fly until you have fully recovered.

    Pilots who have previously made a Pilot Medical Declaration

    If a pilot has previously made a medical declaration using the Avoka form or using the portal, who have declared to an incorrect weight category or who wish to make a declaration to a lower weight category, the pilot must first withdraw their existing declaration, prior to redeclaring to the new weight category.

    If the printable self-declaration confirmation page does not include the pilot's name and/or unique reference number it is therefore not visibly associated with the pilot. 

    While there is no legal obligation to carry the medical self-declaration page, we understand that some pilot's with to keep this with their licence for the purposes of evidencing their credentials. In addition, we do appreciate some pilot training organisations providing self-hire perform a basic check of the pilot's credentials as part of due diligence. 

    We therefore propose that the pilot print and countersign the medical self-declaration page with the following: 

    'I confirm this pilot medical declaration print out is applicable to me and is correct' 

    Print Name 

    CAA Reference Number

    Sign 

    Date

    This will enable a check of the signature against that of the pilot's licence for assurance purposes if required. 

    Existing NPPL Medical Declaration holders

    If you have already made a Medical Declaration under the previous NPPL system that is counter-signed by your GP (Article 73A of the ANO 2009) and made before 25 August 2016, this certificate was only valid for a maximum of five years and therefore not beyond 25 August 2021. All such pilots will be required to make a new medical declaration using the online Pilot Medical Declaration system.

    The previous GP counter-signed declaration is no longer available.

    Conversion to a UK Part-FCL, Part-BFCL or Part-SFCL licence

    Holders of certain licences issued in accordance with the Air Navigation Order or a British Gliding Association issued Gliding Pilot’s Certificate can use the Pilot Medical Declaration when making an initial conversion application for a UK Part-FCL, UK Part-BFCL or Part-SFCL licence.