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UK – EU Transition, and UK Civil Aviation Regulations

To access current UK civil aviation regulations, including AMC and GM, CAA regulatory documents, please use this link to UK Regulation. Please note, if you use information and guidance under the Headings, the references to EU regulations or EU websites in our guidance will not be an accurate information or description of your obligations under UK law. These pages are undergoing reviews and updates.

Alongside our Strategy and Values, we have articulated a set of five regulatory principles that underpin our approach to regulation. These are a set of principles we are guided by when carrying out our work to improve aviation and aerospace for consumers and the public.

Our Regulatory Principles

  • Understanding and addressing risk

    We will understand and address safety, security, and consumer protection risks across the sector, for the benefit of consumers and the general public. We will be clear that primary responsibility lies with those delivering the activity and require them to show us how they manage their own risk. We will work with partners where they are best placed to deliver better outcomes

    One of the main reasons for having an aviation regulator is to protect the public from risks they can’t reasonably assess or protect themselves from, the impacts of which could be very significant. We need to understand and ensure risks are managed in a system-wide way.
  • Delivering unique value

    We will take a proactive, collaborative approach to the functioning and development of the regulatory system in the UK and worldwide. We will facilitate and nurture innovation and help others to do the same. We will deliver independent regulatory oversight within the legislative and policy framework set by Parliament and Government.

    This principle is about what we bring to the table as an organisation. There are some areas where only an independent regulator can perform the role. We need to be able to identify these areas and demonstrate the value we add.
  • Acting proportionately

    We will explore different ways of achieving desired outcomes, regulating only where we have to. The benefits expected from our regulation will outweigh any burden or cost we impose. We will maintain a strong understanding of the differences among the organisations and individuals we regulate and will tailor regulatory approaches accordingly.
  • Engaging proactively and transparently

    We will constantly look outwards and challenge ourselves to prepare for sectoral and technological innovation and new challenges. We will draw on a wide range of evidence, ideas, and feedback from those we regulate and wider society to inform our decisions. We will be clear about how our actions and decisions may affect our stakeholders. We will publish appropriate information in a clear and accessible manner to ensure transparency.

    Independence and accountability are absolutely fundamental for any regulator. Transparency is what brings independence and accountability alive. It helps prevent any regulator from becoming complacent, self-interested or beholden to a subset of stakeholders.
  • Acting on our combined insight

    We will value the collective insights of the CAA, and continually encourage innovative approaches in our work. We will draw on evidence, data, best practice, and external insights, particularly when balancing competing interests or considering trade-offs.

Our five regulatory principles (PDF)

Transcript for Our regulatory principles

Wendi – Introduction

Our Regulatory Principles were introduced in 2021, alongside our values of: 'Do the right
thing', 'Never stop learning', 'Build collaborative relationships' and 'Respect everyone'.

The principles are a framework that should be applied alongside our values, rather than
separately, because they complement and reinforce each other.

Hainsley - Understanding and addressing risk
We say

• We will understand and address safety, security and consumer protection risks across
the sector, for the benefit of consumers and the general public.
• We will be clear that primary responsibility lies with those delivering the activity, and
require them to show us how they manage their own risk.
• We will work with partners where they are best placed to deliver better outcomes.

In practice

One of the main reasons for having an aviation regulator is to protect the public from risks
they can’t reasonably assess or protect themselves from, the impacts of which could be very
significant.
We need to understand and ensure risks are managed in a system-wide way.


Tanya – Delivering unique value

We say

• We will take a proactive, collaborative approach to the functioning and development of
the regulatory system in the UK and worldwide.
• We will facilitate and nurture innovation and help others to do the same.
• We will deliver independent regulatory oversight within the legislative and policy
framework set by Parliament and Government.

In practice

This principle is about what we bring to the table as an organisation.
There are some areas where only an independent regulator can perform the role.
We need to be able to identify these areas and demonstrate the value we add.

Ramesh – Acting proportionately

We say

• We will explore different ways of achieving desired outcomes, regulating only where we
have to.
• The benefits expected from our regulation will outweigh any burden or cost we impose.
• We will maintain a strong understanding of the differences among the organisations and
individuals we regulate, and will tailor regulatory approaches accordingly.

In practice

Proportionality is a key element of the Principles of Good Regulation that we have regard to
and is fundamental to our work.
Regulators should only intervene when necessary; and where regulation is poorly designed
or implemented it can impose excessive costs and inhibit productivity.

Trisha – Engaging proactively and transparently

We say

• We will constantly look outwards and challenge ourselves to prepare for sectoral and
technological innovation and new challenges.
• We will draw on a wide range of evidence, ideas and feedback from those we regulate
and wider society to inform our decisions.
• We will be clear about how our actions and decisions may affect our stakeholders.
• We will publish appropriate information in a clear and accessible manner to ensure
transparency.

In practice

Independence and accountability are absolutely fundamental for any regulator.
Transparency is what brings independence and accountability alive.
It helps prevent any regulator from becoming complacent, self-interested or beholden to a
subset of stakeholders.
Gerard – Acting on our combined insight

We say

• We will value the collective insights of the CAA, and continually encourage innovative
approaches in our work.
• We will draw on evidence, data, best practice and external insights, particularly when
balancing competing interests or considering trade-offs.

In practice

The amount of data that we have access to is ever increasing and there is a legitimate
expectation that we use data and evidence to underpin our decisions.
At the same time there are risks around the type and sheer quantity of available data that
can pose risks to a regulator, such as quality and gaps.
To help overcome these risks, it’s important to understand the data sources available and
consider how to use it intelligently to maximise regulatory outcomes.

Applying the Principles

These principles are an articulation of our regulatory approach, which is designed to improve safety, security and consumer protection outcomes. We will be guided by the principles when designing, prioritising or implementing regulatory activities. We also have regard to the Principles of Good Regulation, the Regulators’ Code and the Regulators’ Growth Duty, and are guided by the consumer principles which provide a consumer focused lens for regulation.

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