The UK Civil Aviation Authority is pleased to announce the long-awaited revision of the UK Microlight Aeroplane definition. Today, 19 August 2021, the new 600kg Microlight classification has been incorporated into law; a reform to the microlight market by raising the weight limit and stalling speed for single and factory built light aeroplanes with up to two seats eligible for national regulation under the Air Navigation Order (ANO) 2016, along with some consequential amendments such as to the Microlight Class Rating.

This decision culminates a three-year review and implementation process in partnership with the wider general aviation community. Through a working group, discussions were had with relevant associations, key manufacturers, and experts to explore various practical issues. This was followed by a public consultation of our proposals in autumn 2019 and published CAP1920 detailing the results. The consultation returned 1,379 responses, the largest response rate to a general aviation consultation in recent years, of which an overwhelming 91% supported this endeavour, and over three-quarters favoured bringing these aeroplanes into the microlight category. 

Sophie-Louise O'Sullivan, Head of Head of General Aviation (GA) & Remotely Piloted Aircraft Systems (RPAS) said, “Our decision to revise the UK Microlight definition not only demonstrates our commitment to the Government's general aviation strategy set out in the Government's recent General Aviation Roadmap but also our commitment to listen and work with the wider UK GA community. This collaborative approach has resulted in an outcome we all support.”

In support of the ANO amendment bringing these aircraft into the scope of the Order, we have also published today a formal CAA Official Record Series (ORS) 4 General Exemption which removes the aircraft from the UK Basic Regulation. In addition, we have summarised and explained these changes and what they mean for the community in CAP2163: Reforming the microlight aeroplane category with further information on the CAA webpages.