What Benefits will the Future Airspace Strategy (FAS) Deliver?

How the strategy will make a difference to airports, airlines, passengers and public

Achieving sustainable growth in aviation is dependent on improving the way air traffic is managed and moves around the airspace. Advancements in ‘Air Traffic Management’ (ATM) can generate significant commercial, environmental and safety benefits including:

Fuel savings from more direct routeing and greater flight efficiency are expected to generate direct financial benefits to operators.

Time savings from more direct routeing and the provision of additional capacity when and where required are expected to generate direct financial benefits to operators.

CO2 savings from more direct routeing and greater flight efficiency are expected to generate societal benefits.

Noise reductions from less aircraft holding at low levels are expected to generate societal benefits.

Passenger time savings from more direct routeing and the provision of additional capacity when and where required are expected to generated societal benefits.

For airports:

  • FAS deployment will enable airports to optimise runway efficiency and better manage queuing on the ground.
     
  • FAS concentrates on increasing the flow of information that is shared across airports, strengthening their resilience to unexpected events and poor weather and introducing new operating techniques to better sequence departures.

For airlines:

  • Re-designing the airspace structure and route network will enable operators to make the most of the capability of their aircraft to fly more continuous climbs and descents into and out of airports and allow more direct routes from departure to destination.

For other airspace users:

  • By implementing continuous ascents for commercial traffic departing airports there is the potential to release some lower levels of controlled airspace back to class G.

  • Through adopting and fitting the latest technology there will also be opportunities to gain easier access to some levels of controlled airspace – for example for airspace crossings.

  •  Flexible use of the airspace, for example the MoD releasing restricted airspace set aside for military flying when it is not in use, will allow more airspace to be available for more users.