Foreign Carriers - Aerial Work - Article 225

Foreign Carriers - Aerial Work - Article 225 of the Air Navigation Order 2009

Do you need a permit?

Aerial survey or aerial photography

Aircraft not registered in the European Economic Area (EEA) may only be used in the UK to undertake aerial survey or aerial photography (whether or not valuable consideration is received by the operator) if the operator holds a permit under Article 225 of the Air Navigation Order 2009.

Other aerial work

Aircraft not registered in the EEA may only to be used for aerial work such as parachute dropping, crop spraying, banner towing, aerial display or flight training[1] in the UK where the operator (or flying instructor) does not receive valuable consideration for his services or holds a permit under Article 225 of the Air Navigation Order 2009.

Duration

Permission for all types of aerial work will normally be given for a fixed period up to a maximum of 12 months.  Permission will not be granted beyond the validity of the certificate of insurance or the certificate of airworthiness, whichever expires first.

Application process

  • Download the application form 
  • An application should be submitted at least two working days before the first flight is due to be undertaken.

    Note that for first time applicants or complex activities an application should be submitted at least 30 days before the aerial work is due to take place.

Attachments

Information or documents that will be required to be submitted in support of an application:

  • A copy of the Certificate of Airworthiness or if the C of A is not time limited please also supply a copy of the latest annual maintenance entry in the aircraft log book;

  • A copy of the Certificate of Registration and if the registered owner is a Trustee, a copy of the trust documents

  • A copy of the Certificate of Liability Insurance for passenger, third party and war risks for aircraft to be used. The level of insurance must meet the minimum requirements of insurance for passenger and third party liability set out in Regulation (EC) 785/2004. More information can be found here Insurance.

  • A copy of the Radio Station Licence if the aircraft is equipped with radio transmitting equipment

  • For flight training details of the person(s) being trained and the type of training being undertaken.

  • Details of how long the aircraft will be in the UK, where it is based and where it will be maintained

Declarations that will be made in the form

  • Confirmation that, to the best of the applicant’s knowledge, the person(s) to be trained meets the medical standards for pilots established in Annex 1 to the Chicago Convention.

  • Confirmation that, to the best of the applicant’s knowledge, all flight crew licences relevant to the flights covered by the permit meet the standards established in Annex 1 to the Chicago Convention

  • Confirmation that, to the best of the applicants knowledge, the operation of the aircraft will be conducted in accordance with the requirements of Part II of Annex 6 to the Chicago Convention

  • Confirmation that the pilot is aware of all requirements of the Air Navigation Order 2009 (as amended) and associated Regulations which will apply to intended flights 

Flying training includes any flights with instructors which are necessary to maintain the validity of a licence. Permission for flying training will normally be given only to the owners of the aircraft concerned or to any pilot employed by the owner to fly the aircraft on their behalf. If the aircraft is owned by a Trust, permission may be given to the trustor. If the trustor is a group or company permission may be given to members of that group or directors if the number of members or directors is no more than four.